mimbeau:

Charles Hewitt
Montmartre
Paris 1950s

mimbeau:

Charles Hewitt

Montmartre

Paris 1950s

337 Notes

usclibraries:

A Union 76 gasoline pump in 1932, when a gallon sold for 17½ cents. (USC Libraries/Dick Whittington Photography Collection)

usclibraries:

A Union 76 gasoline pump in 1932, when a gallon sold for 17½ cents. (USC Libraries/Dick Whittington Photography Collection)

41 Notes

fleurdulys:

Magarethe Stonborough-Wittgenstein - Gustav Klimt

fleurdulys:

Magarethe Stonborough-Wittgenstein - Gustav Klimt

129 Notes

egonschiele-art:

Krumau on the Molde, The Small City, 1912
Egon Schiele

egonschiele-art:

Krumau on the Molde, The Small City, 1912

Egon Schiele

99 Notes

omgthatdress:

Ensemble
1845
The Victoria & Albert Museum

omgthatdress:

Ensemble

1845

The Victoria & Albert Museum

(via notwiselybuttoowell)

128 Notes

(Source: syflove, via thisivyhouse)

108 Notes

4 Notes

houghtonlib:

Catholic Church. Book of Hours and Missal : manuscript, [between 1485 and 1490].

MS Typ 443.1

Houghton Library, Harvard University

49 Notes

oupacademic:

Hermes weighing souls (psychostasis). In Book 5, Hermes, messenger of the gods, is sent to tell the nymph Kalypso to allow Odysseus to leave so he can return home after several years of being detained on the island of Ogygia. Hermes is also known as the god of boundaries, and as such he is Psychopompos, or “soul-guide”: He leads the souls of the dead to the house of Hades. In a sense, Odysseus is dead, imprisoned on an island in the middle of the sea by Kalypso, the “concealer.” Here the god is shown with winged shoes (in Homer they are “immortal, golden”) and a traveler’s broad-brimmed hat, hanging behind his head from a cord. In his left hand he carries his typical wand, the caduceus, a rod entwined by two copulating snakes. In his right hand he holds a scale with two pans, in each of which is a psychê, a “breath-soul” represented as a miniature man (scarcely visible in the picture). Athenian red-figure amphora from Nola, c. 460 BC, by the Nikon Painter.
From The Odyssey by Homer, translated by Barry B. Powell.

oupacademic:

Hermes weighing souls (psychostasis). In Book 5, Hermes, messenger of the gods, is sent to tell the nymph Kalypso to allow Odysseus to leave so he can return home after several years of being detained on the island of Ogygia. Hermes is also known as the god of boundaries, and as such he is Psychopompos, or “soul-guide”: He leads the souls of the dead to the house of Hades. In a sense, Odysseus is dead, imprisoned on an island in the middle of the sea by Kalypso, the “concealer.” Here the god is shown with winged shoes (in Homer they are “immortal, golden”) and a traveler’s broad-brimmed hat, hanging behind his head from a cord. In his left hand he carries his typical wand, the caduceus, a rod entwined by two copulating snakes. In his right hand he holds a scale with two pans, in each of which is a psychê, a “breath-soul” represented as a miniature man (scarcely visible in the picture). Athenian red-figure amphora from Nola, c. 460 BC, by the Nikon Painter.

From The Odyssey by Homer, translated by Barry B. Powell.

98 Notes

gentlewave:

Cécile Izambert: Le livre de la chasse de Gaston Fébus, [Book of the Hunt by Gaston Phoebus (1331–1391), “chien flairant”, [detail], medieval illuminated manuscript. On parchment pasted on cardboard timber. Gold leaf on gum ammoniac. Velin. 18.5 x 17 cm, private collection, source: cizambert.canalblog.com. Please visit the website of Atelier Cécile Izambert for more wonderful works of medieval art! 

gentlewave:

Cécile Izambert: Le livre de la chasse de Gaston Fébus, [Book of the Hunt by Gaston Phoebus (1331–1391), “chien flairant”, [detail], medieval illuminated manuscript. On parchment pasted on cardboard timber. Gold leaf on gum ammoniac. Velin. 18.5 x 17 cm, private collection, source: cizambert.canalblog.com. Please visit the website of Atelier Cécile Izambert for more wonderful works of medieval art! 

(via sexycodicology)

34 Notes