smithsonianlibraries:

July 31st is the birthday of artist and naturalist Mary Vaux Walcott. Born in 1860, Walcott took an early interest in the arts. After spending many of her summers in the wilds of Western Canada with her family, she turned her artistic inclinations towards botanical illustration. Later in life, she married Charles Doolittle Walcott, who was Secretary of the Smithsonian at the time (1914).

She returned to the Rockies for many months out of the year with Charles as he conducted paleontological and geological studies. There she continued her watercolor studies of native flowers. The Smithsonian published her illustrations in North American Wild Flowers in 1925 in a five volume set that you can find in the Biodiversity Heritage Library.  

We’ve posted about Walcott before, here and here. Her work is exceptionally beautiful, and we think some of the blooms here might have even been in bloom around her birthday.

129 Notes

othmeralia:

Never say ‘dye’ - say ‘RIT’
Sounds like a dye for Bond girls, don’t you think?
Image credit: Advertisement for RIT  dyes, Good Housekeeping, 1920. CHF Archives.

othmeralia:

Never say ‘dye’ - say ‘RIT’

Sounds like a dye for Bond girls, don’t you think?

Image credit: Advertisement for RIT  dyes, Good Housekeeping, 1920. CHF Archives.

13 Notes

Daisy. Plate from ‘Choix de Plantes de l’Europe Centrale et Particulièrement de la Suisse et de la Savoie.’
Published 1878 by F. Richard in Genève
archive.org

Daisy. Plate from ‘Choix de Plantes de l’Europe Centrale et Particulièrement de la Suisse et de la Savoie.’

Published 1878 by F. Richard in Genève

archive.org

19 Notes

'Étude de Volubilis' par G. Lebart. Printed by Berlin & Cie, Imp. Lecoq & Mathorel, Paris
Source -‘Album de la Décoration’
Image and text courtesy NYPL Digital Gallery

'Étude de Volubilis' par G. Lebart. Printed by Berlin & Cie, Imp. Lecoq & Mathorel, Paris

Source -‘Album de la Décoration’

Image and text courtesy NYPL Digital Gallery

79 Notes

'Cranes in Flight' (1889-1928) by Gerhard Heilmann.
Source -  Dekorative Vorbilder : eine Sammlung von figürlichen Darstellungen und kunstgewerblichen Verzierungen. (Stuttgart : Julius Hoffman, 1889-1928) .
Image and text courtesy NYPL Digital Gallery 

'Cranes in Flight' (1889-1928) by Gerhard Heilmann.

Source -  Dekorative Vorbilder : eine Sammlung von figürlichen Darstellungen und kunstgewerblichen Verzierungen. (Stuttgart : Julius Hoffman, 1889-1928) .

Image and text courtesy NYPL Digital Gallery 

30 Notes

'Then they saw a snow-white swan come drawing down the tide a little boat of pearly sheen.' Illustration by Willy Pogány from 'The Tale of Lohengrin, Knight of the Swan' (after the drama of Richard Wagner) by T. W. Rolleston. Published 1914  by Crowell.    
archive.org                                                  

'Then they saw a snow-white swan come drawing down the tide a little boat of pearly sheen.' Illustration by Willy Pogány from 'The Tale of Lohengrin, Knight of the Swan' (after the drama of Richard Wagner) by T. W. Rolleston. Published 1914  by Crowell.    

archive.org                                                  

45 Notes

'The Hammersmith Ghost' etching. Published by R. S. Kirby. London House Yard & I Scott. 447 Strand. Feb 1 1804.
I found this etching whilst looking for images to post and as I was in the Hammersmith area of London recently (and not knowing much about the area) I thought that I’d research the image. There are differing accounts online but the basic story is consistent.
Towards the end of 1803 several people in Hammersmith reported seeing and some were apparently attacked by a ghost. One terrified woman walking near a churchyard claimed that a ghost had risen from the gravestones and put it’s arms around her, she fainted and died of shock two days later. ”Neither man, woman, nor child could pass that way for some time” and the report was that it was “the apparition of a man who cut his throat in the neighbourhood.” (Faulkner - History of Hammersmith from ‘British History Online’). 
Armed vigilante groups were set up and Thomas Millwood, a bricklayer ( some accounts say a plasterer), who wore white clothes ( white linen trousers, a flannel waistcoat and an apron) was mistakenly shot and killed by Francis Smith an excise officer. He was found guilty of murder and sentenced to death which was commuted to one year’s hard labour.
Apparently, the real ‘ghost’, a shoemaker, confessed later but other accounts say that a ghost appears every 50 years in Hammersmith.

The question of whether acting on a mistaken belief was a sufficient defence to a criminal charge was debated for nearly two centuries ( 180 years) until it was clarified at the Court of Appeal in the case R. v Williams (Gladstone) (1984)  Wikipedia.
Image courtesy NYPL Digital Gallery

'The Hammersmith Ghost' etching. Published by R. S. Kirby. London House Yard & I Scott. 447 Strand. Feb 1 1804.

I found this etching whilst looking for images to post and as I was in the Hammersmith area of London recently (and not knowing much about the area) I thought that I’d research the image. There are differing accounts online but the basic story is consistent.

Towards the end of 1803 several people in Hammersmith reported seeing and some were apparently attacked by a ghost. One terrified woman walking near a churchyard claimed that a ghost had risen from the gravestones and put it’s arms around her, she fainted and died of shock two days later. ”Neither man, woman, nor child could pass that way for some time” and the report was that it was “the apparition of a man who cut his throat in the neighbourhood.” (Faulkner - History of Hammersmith from ‘British History Online’). 

Armed vigilante groups were set up and Thomas Millwood, a bricklayer ( some accounts say a plasterer), who wore white clothes ( white linen trousers, a flannel waistcoat and an apron) was mistakenly shot and killed by Francis Smith an excise officer. He was found guilty of murder and sentenced to death which was commuted to one year’s hard labour.

Apparently, the real ‘ghost’, a shoemaker, confessed later but other accounts say that a ghost appears every 50 years in Hammersmith.

The question of whether acting on a mistaken belief was a sufficient defence to a criminal charge was debated for nearly two centuries ( 180 years) until it was clarified at the Court of Appeal in the case R. v Williams (Gladstone) (1984)  Wikipedia.

Image courtesy NYPL Digital Gallery

8 Notes

Geometridae by Christian Friedrich Carl Kleemann. Published 1761.
From Beyträge zur Natur- oder Insecten-Geschichte.
Image and text courtesy NYPL Digital Gallery

Geometridae by Christian Friedrich Carl Kleemann. Published 1761.

From Beyträge zur Natur- oder Insecten-Geschichte.

Image and text courtesy NYPL Digital Gallery

78 Notes

'From the swan's neck loos'd he a twisted ring of the beaten gold.' Illustration by Willy Pogány from 'The Tale of Lohengrin, Knight of the Swan' (after the drama of Richard Wagner) by T. W. Rolleston. Published 1914  by Crowell.    
archive.org                                       

'From the swan's neck loos'd he a twisted ring of the beaten gold.' Illustration by Willy Pogány from 'The Tale of Lohengrin, Knight of the Swan' (after the drama of Richard Wagner) by T. W. Rolleston. Published 1914  by Crowell.    

archive.org                                       

16 Notes

Jacob’s Ladder or Greek Valerian. Plate from ‘Choix de Plantes de l’Europe Centrale et Particulièrement de la Suisse et de la Savoie.’
Published 1878 by F. Richard in Genève
archive.org

Jacob’s Ladder or Greek Valerian. Plate from ‘Choix de Plantes de l’Europe Centrale et Particulièrement de la Suisse et de la Savoie.’

Published 1878 by F. Richard in Genève

archive.org

11 Notes